Summit 400-48t Enable Advanced Edge License

Posted in Code, Networking on March 3rd, 2014 by termina

I noticed the license is a length 7 numeric value, so I modified an existing script floating around for the Summit 400-48t. Should work with any Summit 200/300/400 however.

You may need to modify the “Summit400” near the end of the file to match your prompt. This runs much quicker than I’d think; got my license after 4 hours or so.

Uncomment the dump.log line if you have trouble to debug


#!/usr/bin/perl
use Net::Telnet;
use warnings;

$t = new Net::Telnet(
Timeout => 10,
# Dump_Log => "dump.log",
Prompt => '/\* Summit*$/',
Errmode=>'die'
);
$t->open('SWITCHIPADDRESS');
$t->waitfor('/login: $/i');
$t->print('admin');
$t->waitfor('/password: $/i');
$t->print('YOURPASSWORD');
$t->waitfor('/Summit400/i');

for($x = 1; $x < 9999999; ++$x) { print "Trying: $x\n"; #@lines = $t->cmd("enable license advanced-edge $x");
$t->print("enable license advanced-edge $x");
$t->waitfor('/Summit400/i');
}

Merge Sort in Bash

Posted in Code, Informational on October 7th, 2013 by hobogod

So, during spring break, I was extremely bored and implimented merge sort into a language that doesn’t really need it: Bash. I got inspiration to do this from seeing  merge sort implimented in Prolog. As of right now, it merely sorts integers, but can sort anything, given that a compareTo method of what you want sorted is written into the merge method (bash isn’t object oriented, so it’s not really so adaptable to adaptability.) I doubt I’m the first person to do this, but it’s a nice thought experiment to see how limited languages can still allow the performance of advanced operations. I don’t guarantee that this algorithm performs in n*log(n) time as I’m not sure of the individual costs of bash operations or the cost of reading and executing this, but I tested it with 1330 numbers and it sorted them in about 35 seconds on my 1.6 Ghz laptop.


#!/bin/bash

mrgsrt() {
# This function impliments the merge sort algorithm into bash.
#
# @Author: Adam Vite

if [ $# = 1 ]; then
echo $1;
# There is only one arguement, list is sorted
elif [ $# -gt 1 ]; then
i=0;
unset left;
unset right;
for x in [email protected] ; do
if [ $i -lt $(($# / 2)) ]; then
left=$( echo $left $x );
i=$(($i + 1));
else
right=$( echo $right $x );
fi;
done;
# The arguments have been split in half

left=$( mrgsrt $left );
right=$( mrgsrt $right );
# each half has been sorted recursively

mrg $left $right;
# The two halves have been merged together with a helper method
else
echo "Usage: mrgsrt <series of numbers seperated by spaces>";
fi;
}

mrg() {
# This method sorts two sorted lists of numbers by adding the lowest of
# firstmost unsorted number into a new list until all numbers have been
# added and then returns that list.
#
# @Author: Adam Vite

l=1; # Begining index of left half
r=$(($# / 2 + 1)); # Begining index of right half
unset list;
while [ $l -ne $(($# / 2 + 1)) ] || [ $r -ne $(($# + 1)) ]; do
if [ $l = $(($# / 2 + 1)) ]; then
list=$( echo $list ${!r} );
r=$(($r+1));
# Left half has been sorted

elif [ $r = $(($# + 1)) ]; then
list=$( echo $list ${!l} );
l=$(($l+1));

# Right half has been sorted

elif [ ${!l} -lt ${!r} ]; then
list=$( echo $list ${!l} );
l=$(($l+1));
# Firstmost unsorted left is less than firstmost unsorted right
else
list=$( echo $list ${!r} );
r=$(($r+1));
# Firstmost unsorted right is less than firstmost unsorted left
fi;
done;
echo $list;
}

LDAP User Add Script

Posted in Code, LDAP, Security on September 13th, 2010 by termina

A bug with phpldapadmin in Ubuntu 10.04 has forced me to find other ways to add a generic Linux account to LDAP.

This consists of three files; I keep them in /root/ldap and have a symlink to add_ldap_user.sh in /usr/local/bin

add_ldap_user.sh Script

last.uid The last used UID, auto-incriments

user.ldif Sample linux account in LDIF format

add_ldap_user.sh


#!/bin/bash
NEWUID=`cat /root/ldap/last.uid`
echo -ne "First Name: "
read FIRST
echo -ne "Last Name: "
read LAST
echo -ne "User Name: "
read USERNAME

sed “s/FIRST/`echo $FIRST`/g” /root/ldap/user.ldif > /root/ldap/temp
sed “s/LAST/`echo $LAST`/g” /root/ldap/temp > /root/ldap/temp2
sed “s/USERNAME/`echo $USERNAME`/g” /root/ldap/temp2 > /root/ldap/temp
sed “s/USERUID/`echo $NEWUID`/g” /root/ldap/temp > /root/ldap/temp2

ldapadd -x -w`cat /etc/ldap.secret` -D “cn=admin,dc=YOUR,dc=HOSTNAME” < /root/ldap/temp2
echo `expr $NEWUID + 1` > /root/ldap/last.uid
rm /root/ldap/temp
rm /root/ldap/temp2
passwd $USERNAME

user.ldif


dn: cn=FIRST LAST,ou=People,dc=YOUR,dc=HOSTNAME
objectClass: inetOrgPerson
objectClass: posixAccount
objectClass: top
givenName: FIRST
sn: LAST
cn: FIRST LAST
uid: USERNAME
userPassword: {MD5}QaJUwABOZ6gUsv/xOD/FOQ==
gidNumber: 100
homeDirectory: /home/USERNAME
loginShell: /bin/bash
uidNumber: USERUID

last.uid

1900

Note that because the LDIF contains a place-holder password, you must be able to run ‘passwd LDAP-USER’ on the host you are running this on.

Merge Sort in Bash

Posted in Code on March 25th, 2010 by hobogod

Thanks to Adam Vite for this.

So, during spring break, I was extremely bored and implimented merge sort into a language that doesn’t really need it: Bash. I got inspiration to do this from seeing  merge sort implimented in Prolog. As of right now, it merely sorts integers, but can sort anything, given that a compareTo method of what you want sorted is written into the merge method (bash isn’t object oriented, so it’s not really so adaptable to adaptability.) I doubt I’m the first person to do this, but it’s a nice thought experiment to see how limited languages can still allow the performance of advanced operations. I don’t guarantee that this algorithm performs in n*log(n) time as I’m not sure of the individual costs of bash operations or the cost of reading and executing this, but I tested it with 1330 numbers and it sorted them in about 35 seconds on my 1.6 Ghz laptop.

#!/bin/bash

mrgsrt() {
# This function impliments the merge sort algorithm into bash.
#
# @Author: Adam Vite

if [ $# = 1 ]; then
echo $1;
# There is only one arguement, list is sorted
elif [ $# -gt 1 ]; then
i=0;
unset left;
unset right;
for x in [email protected] ; do
if [ $i -lt $(($# / 2)) ]; then
left=$( echo $left $x );
i=$(($i + 1));
else
right=$( echo $right $x );
fi;
done;
# The arguments have been split in half

left=$( mrgsrt $left );
right=$( mrgsrt $right );
# each half has been sorted recursively

mrg $left $right;
# The two halves have been merged together with a helper method
else
echo “Usage: mrgsrt <series of numbers seperated by spaces>”;
fi;
}

mrg() {
# This method sorts two sorted lists of numbers by adding the lowest of
# firstmost unsorted number into a new list until all numbers have been
# added and then returns that list.
#
# @Author: Adam Vite

l=1; # Begining index of left half
r=$(($# / 2 + 1)); # Begining index of right half
unset list;
while [ $l -ne $(($# / 2 + 1)) ] || [ $r -ne $(($# + 1)) ]; do
if [ $l = $(($# / 2 + 1)) ]; then
list=$( echo $list ${!r} );
r=$(($r+1));
# Left half has been sorted

elif [ $r = $(($# + 1)) ]; then
list=$( echo $list ${!l} );
l=$(($l+1));

# Right half has been sorted

elif [ ${!l} -lt ${!r} ]; then
list=$( echo $list ${!l} );
l=$(($l+1));
# Firstmost unsorted left is less than firstmost unsorted right
else
list=$( echo $list ${!r} );
r=$(($r+1));
# Firstmost unsorted right is less than firstmost unsorted left
fi;
done;
echo $list;
}

Remote backdoor on Linux using ‘nc’

Posted in Code, Security on April 25th, 2008 by termina

nc -l -e /bin/bash -p 10001

Not much to explain here. -l listens for incoming connections, -e executes /bin/bash when you connect, and -p chooses the port to listen on.

You must use a semicolon after each command.

[email protected]:~$ telnet localhost 10001
Trying 127.0.0.1…
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is ‘^]’.
whoami;
will

There you go. Obviously this has the potential for misuse; running this as root will create a remote backdoor after all. But it’s also a very useful administrative tool. Keep in mind that nc is not encrypted in any way, and anyone could use this to connect.

nc terminates after you exit your connection, and only one person can be connected at once.

Startup Scripts in Debian

Posted in Code, Informational on February 18th, 2008 by termina

If you would like to add a custom startup script to your Linux machine (for running ircd or an iptables script for example) the process is simple.

Create a file in /etc/init.d

touch /etc/init.d/program

chmod +x /etc/init.d/program

Edit it, and create something like this

#!/bin/bash

case $1 in

start)

sudo -u irc /home/ircd/unreal start

;;

stop)

sudo -u irc /home/ircd/unreal stop

;;

esac

These scripts are run as root, so you should probably use sudo to run programs as unprivileged users.

Now we just have to add it to our default runlevel (runlevel can be found in /etc/inittab on Debian, in Ubuntu this file does not exist as far as I know). The runlevel should be the same across all Debian (including ubuntu) systems.

ln -s /etc/init.d/program /etc/rc2.d/S20program

The S20 requires a little bit of explanation. S means Start, and 20 means to run after the 19’s but before the 21+’s. It’s simply a priority system.  You can replace S with K to ‘stop’ instead of ‘start’ when the computer shuts down.